Government re-education for Native American children in Canada

Government re-education for Native American children in Canada

“Yes, ma’am, no, sir, thank you, please: you say it all naturally, in a non-forced manner!” A white journalist for Canadian broadcaster CBC noted this after watching a film at a school Kamloops filmed in British Columbia in 1962. The humble children the television producers were passionate about were indigenous people. They were not willingly in “residential schools”, often run by churches. Indigenous children were seen praying, singing, and in class in the 1962 Christmas Christmas film “The Eyes of Children”. “Many of you can never be worse than your parents,” one guard announced to the camera.

The day children of 130 institutions across the country were in panic was not visible. At the time of the shooting, monk Gerald Matthew Moran was employed at Kamloops, who was convicted decades later of sexually abusing boys at a very young age. Former prisoners also reported decades later that girls had been raped as well. One of them was Janet Jules, who testified in 2013: “At night a guard came into the dormitory and blinded us with a flashlight. We asked ourselves: who will he take with him this time? Kamloop’s school is back in the limelight after the remains of 215 children buried there were found.

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